Thursday Doors

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We drive past this door almost every time we are in Cork City and it always catches my eye and cries out to be a Thursday Door. It’s set in a very long stone wall.

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The wall eventually leads to a couple of windows but I’m not sure if the door and windows are part of the same property. There are lots of similar stone buildings dotted around the city and many of them are still in use, like Coláiste Daibhéid (David’s College) a post primary school that teaches through the Irish language. It’s in Sawmill Street and adjacent to St. John’s Central College that I featured in last week’s Thursday Doors.

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At the top of  the Sawmill Street there is a row of lovely old Victorian houses in Newenham Terrace. The gates were closed so I couldn’t get any closer but you can see from the photo they are well preserved in their original state, even retaining their old sash windows. Nice to see a red door in there, too.

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Sawmill Street leads onto Infirmary Road, a busy place to try and take photographs but I managed to get a shot of another old building – City General Hospital.

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Next to this is the Victoria Hospital, which has a lovely arched entrance and an equally lovely red door.

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The Victoria Hospital first opened its doors in a different location in 1874 and was known at the time as The County and City of Cork Hospital for Women and Children. It was moved to its present site in 1885. The name was changed to The Victoria Hospital for Women and Children in 1901 and male patients were first admitted in 1914.

The fact that I featured two hospital buildings in this week’s post might have something to do with my aching joints, having spent a week working on our old house. But it’s beginning to look and feel a bit more habitable now (on the inside, at least), so it’s well worth the effort.

Thank you for joining me on this tour of Sawmill Street/Infirmary Road on this week’s Thursday Doors. There are lots more doors to see over on Norm’s blog, from many different parts of the globe.

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About Jean Reinhardt

Author of 'A Pocket Full of Shells' an Amazon International best seller, Jean writes young adult and historical fiction. She has been known to shed a tear over Little House on the Prairie.
This entry was posted in Historical buildings, Ireland, Thursday Doors, victorian ireland and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to Thursday Doors

  1. Dan Antion says:

    Well, Jean, since I love stone buildings, that seems like a perfect door to feature. I am impressed with the length of those stone walls. Just thinking of the work involved makes my back hurt a little.Thanks for taking us along on this little walk.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jackie says:

    Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jack Eason says:

    Careful Jean. You never what may lurking behind an old door like that. Narnia, Middle Earth, Oz? The list of possibilities is endless. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  4. love your doors, and the one taken through the window.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Mel & Suan says:

    Hmmm…that door in the stone wall looks lonely!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Love the door in the stone wall! Slainte, Jean!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. willowdot21 says:

    Great post 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  8. jesh stg says:

    What is there to say – I grew up with brick buildings so I live them! Love the capture kind of in the middle with the gate in front and the row of doors. Well, we seemed to be in a similar physical state, but for a different reason. Have been working on the 10 x 17 feet painting, and not used to walk stairs up and down as much as I do now. Hope you are taking pics from the before and in-between state state of the extensive remodel:)

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Norm 2.0 says:

    I’m another fan of old stone buildings so this post was right up my alley. I’m glad to hear you’re making progress on your reno – hopefully not too much longer now?

    Liked by 1 person

  10. JT Twissel says:

    That top door is certainly a door for the ages, isn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Candy says:

    If doors could talk – lots of history in your post. Any time you find red doors is a bonus.

    Liked by 1 person

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