Thursday Doors – Moira

This Thursday Doors post comes from the Northern Ireland town of Moira. I took the photos as we drove through and really like the mix of stone and brick in this first one.

A little further up the street we find Jackson’s hardware and cookware store. Apparantly they sell some lovely garden furniture too, judging by the items on display in the above image.

Another Jackson’s store, with similar wicker furniture and what looks like household goods in the window.

Not a very Irish or English sounding word on this building but I think it translates to Clover House. I like how the car colour matches that of the lovely orange door. That black door is quite interesting, too.

So many lovely old archways in this town. I was spoiled for choice.

If you are thinking the town is named after a woman, you’d be wrong. The name Moira comes from the Irish word Maigh Rath, meaning ‘plain of the streams or wheels’ and has been a settlement for at least 1,500 years.

“This small village has had an enormous impact on social, political, religious and military life not only in Ireland but also in the United Kingdom and across the world. The village was once a place where Knights and Earls had their magnificent estate; where the children of nobility played and the children of the lowly laboured. A lad who grew up in poverty became a hero in the American War of Independence while another who was raised in grand surroundings was to become largely responsible for the establishing of Central India as part of the British Empire.” You can read more about the history of this interesting, quaint town in County Down, Northern Ireland if you follow the link at the end of this post*

More lovely mixes of stone and brick with a ‘gonedoor’ thrown in, as my grandson called it. Anyone thinking of Lord of the Rings right now?

Dan has a lovely selection of Thursday Doors over on his blog, thanks for stopping by and veiwing the town of Moira with me.

History of Moira*

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About Jean Reinhardt

Author of 'A Pocket Full of Shells' an Amazon International best seller, Jean writes young adult and historical fiction. She has been known to shed a tear over Little House on the Prairie.
This entry was posted in Blogging, Historical buildings, History, Thursday Doors, Travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Thursday Doors – Moira

  1. conspicari says:

    Great selection of doors and archways. We have a village in Leicestershire named Moira, not as picturesque as the one you have photographed.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Dan Antion says:

    Lovely doors and interesting information, Jean. I love the stone buildings and the first one with stone and brick. I love all the arches.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Emille says:

    Hi Jean, the last weeks I have not been much in blog land because prepping for an art workshop, but there was that moment this week that I thought – I haven’t heard from Jean for some time …wonder how she is doing?
    Wow, that is unheard of that children of nobility played with the children of the laboured. Wished that happened more, so when they grew up to adults they would at least understand each other and talk to each other!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Jennie says:

    I love the stone and brick mix. What a charming town!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. slfinnell says:

    Drive-thru trips lead to great posts! šŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  6. marianallen says:

    Gorgeous doors, and I’m all about the arches! “Gonedoor” is now A Thing. The doors formerly known as “ghost doors” are forevermore “gonedoors” to me. šŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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